What was the agent?

4 recent comments. Last made over 1 year ago.

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Tom Tom | over 1 year ago
Untitled

Yeah, I think he didn't want to spend much time dealing with how it happened and how we didn't catch it and can we stop it... and instead wanted to deal with "this is happening."  

The primordial singularity was a nice throw-in, because it at least scratched the itch of "What the heck could this have been???"

I kept waiting for him to diverge out in part three into some explanation of aliens or SOMETHING and was kind of glad he didn't.  It's hard sci-fi, and the "Agent" was a a construct, a plot device to get him into the frame for the story he wanted to tell.  

We'll never know!  Unless he heeds the beggars: SEQUEL, SEQUEL, SEQUEL!!!



Tom Tom | over 1 year ago
Untitled

Yeah, I think he didn't want to spend much time dealing with how it happened and how we didn't catch it and can we stop it... and instead wanted to deal with "this is happening."  

The primordial singularity was a nice throw-in, because it at least scratched the itch of "What the heck could this have been???"

I kept waiting for him to diverge out in part three into some explanation of aliens or SOMETHING and was kind of glad he didn't.  It's hard sci-fi, and the "Agent" was a a construct, a plot device to get him into the frame for the story he wanted to tell.  

We'll never know!  Unless he heeds the beggars: SEQUEL, SEQUEL, SEQUEL!!!



Jared Kelsey Jared Kelsey | over 1 year ago
Untitled

Did not one of the characters early in the first chapter or two suggest the agent could have been a "primordial singularity"? That could work. Or it was a Monolith.



Raj Raj | almost 2 years ago
No idea

Good question.  Perhaps Neal would answer or at least give some of his more concrete speculative assumptions as to why the moon suddenly blew up.  



Dan Dan | over 1 year ago

My thinking:

If the book wasn't hard science fiction, there are lots of opportunities that present themselves.  Maybe they would make for interesting stories as well.  You could have some kind of atomic explosion, or a rogue sun, alien invaders, or just create a word ("moonquake" from John Christopher for example), go with that and get on the drama.

Since Seveneves is hard science fiction, a solution should follow what we understand as scientific fact.  

Not knowing something, is part of science. 

Here's a handy example:  We know with incredible certainty that Saturn has rings.  We know a lot about those rings (having flows spaceships through them).  We have many theories about how they were created, how old they are, and what went into forming them.  But there's LOTS we don't know about them.  Some things we can guess, some things we can't know.




Daniel Platon Daniel Platon | almost 2 years ago

The nature of the Agent is not really important. The whole story is build around an event that puts the mankind's imagination and problem solving skills to the test. We don't really care about the event itself, since it's just the "initial condition" of a problem.

We find a similar structure in World War Z - we don't care if zombies exist or why the exist. They are just the starting point of the story, the problem that mankind has to solve.